Chicago Architecture Info
Bank of America Building
Formerly known as 135 South LaSalle
LaSalle Bank Building
Field Building
Address
135 South LaSalle Street
Chicago, Illinois 60603
<b>Fire damage visible from the December 6, 2004 blaze.</b><br>Photograph © Wayne Lorentz/Artefaqs Corporation.
Click here to purchase prints or download images of Bank of America Building
<b>Fire damage visible from the December 6, 2004 blaze.</b><br>Photograph © Wayne Lorentz/Artefaqs Corporation.
Click here to purchase prints or download images of Bank of America Building
<b>Fire damage visible from the December 6, 2004 blaze.</b><br>Photograph © Wayne Lorentz/Artefaqs Corporation.
Click here to purchase prints or download images of Bank of America Building
<b>Fire damage visible from the December 6, 2004 blaze.</b><br>Photograph © Wayne Lorentz/Artefaqs Corporation.
Click here to purchase prints or download images of Bank of America Building
<b>Fire damage visible from the December 6, 2004 blaze.</b><br>Photograph © Wayne Lorentz/Artefaqs Corporation.
Click here to purchase prints or download images of Bank of America Building
Basic Information
Designed by Graham, Anderson, Probst & White
Type Skyscraper
Floors: 44
Maximum height 535 feet/161 meters
Neighborhood: The Loop
More Information
  • Floor space: 1,000,000 square feet.
  • This building was erected by the estate of department store magnate Marshall Field. It was intended to be the largest office building in the Loop.
  • This is considered to be the last true Art Deco skyscraper built in Chicago's Loop district.
  • This was the last major building erected in Chicago before a lull in construction brought on by the Great Depression and the Second World War.
  • At the fifth floor are 17 panels depicting Robert Cavelier de la Salle's exploration of the area. He is believed to have made camp at this location.
  • Considered by some to be Chicago's Empire State Building
  • December 6, 2004: Fire broke out on the 29th floor of this skyscraper. It was the second high-rise fire in Chicago's Loop in two years. The fire burned for five hours, and spread to the 30th floor, but no one was hurt. The building was in the process of being fitted with fire sprinklers. At the time of the fire, sprinklers were not required in buildings erected before 1975. *December 20, 2004: For the first time since the December 6 fire, people were finally allowed back into their offices, but only on about a dozen lower floors. The rest remained closed for weeks.