340 On The Park in Chicago

Photo of 340 On The Park in Chicago, Illinois
Photograph © Wayne Lorentz/Artefaqs Corporation
Photo of 340 On The Park in Chicago, Illinois
Photograph © Wayne Lorentz/Artefaqs Corporation
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Photo of 340 On The Park in Chicago, Illinois
Photograph © Wayne Lorentz/Artefaqs Corporation
Photo of 340 On The Park in Chicago, Illinois
Photograph © Wayne Lorentz/Artefaqs Corporation
Photo of 340 On The Park in Chicago, Illinois
Photograph © Wayne Lorentz/Artefaqs Corporation
Photo of 340 On The Park in Chicago, Illinois
Photograph © Wayne Lorentz/Artefaqs Corporation
Photo of 340 On The Park in Chicago, Illinois
Photograph © Wayne Lorentz/Artefaqs Corporation
Photo of 340 On The Park in Chicago, Illinois
Photograph © Wayne Lorentz/Artefaqs Corporation
Photo of 340 On The Park in Chicago, Illinois
Photograph © Wayne Lorentz/Artefaqs Corporation
Photo of 340 On The Park in Chicago, Illinois
Photograph © Artefaqs Corporation
Photo of 340 On The Park in Chicago, Illinois
Photograph © Wayne Lorentz/Artefaqs Corporation
Photo of 340 On The Park in Chicago, Illinois
Photograph © Wayne Lorentz/Artefaqs Corporation
Photo of 340 On The Park in Chicago, Illinois
Photograph © Wayne Lorentz/Artefaqs Corporation
Photo of 340 On The Park in Chicago, Illinois
Photograph © Wayne Lorentz/Artefaqs Corporation

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340 On The Park

340 East Randolph Street, Chicago, Illinois, The Loop 60601
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One of the largest buildings to be erected in Chicago's "New Eastside" neighborhood since the Aon Center, 340 On The Park fills in the final gap in the Randolph Street skyline facing Millennium Park and Grant Park. It also provides a link between the East Loop's architectural past and future. This is an area that saw its first residential development in buildings like The Buckingham and 400 East Randolph. Both are substantial properties, but neither is particularly architecturally inspiring. They are symbols of the eras in which they were constructed; when exposed concrete beam grids were a good thing, and apartment blocks were more utilitarian. Fast forward to the 21st Century, and people living in apartment towers and condo blocks care quite a bit about what their building looks like, especially if they're spending millions on a new home in the sky. 340 On The Park satisfies this vanity by presenting a thoroughly modern appearance with glass curtain walls, and reflective geometries. But it also harmonizes with its neighbors. To the west is the Blue Cross Blue Shield Tower, itself one of Chicago's better uses of glass. And to the east is the previously mentioned Buckingham, with is bays and channels presenting themselves to the world in all of its beige stucco glory. 340 continues the Blue Cross tower's blue glass aesthetic while blending with the Buckingham's concrete grid. 340 On The Park uses that grid homage as an opportunity to provide balconies, which the Buckingham is sorely missing. 340's footprint is also of similar size as the Buckingham, though it is nearly a third taller. At the time of its completion, 340 On The Park was taller than the Blue Cross Blue Shield Tower, but that won't last long as the height of BCBS is roughly doubling with the addition of 30+ stories to the existing structure.

Quick Facts
Timeline
  • November 2, 2006: A fire broke out on the 24th floor. Workers were evacuated from the building, and streets in the area were closed for hours.
  • July 18, 2007: This building officially opened.
Notes
  • This building was designed by Martin Wolf.
  • The living rooms, dining rooms, and kitchens are floored with bamboo instead of wood, except for the 16 penthouses.
  • The 25th floor is two-and-a-half stories tall, and contains a lap pool, fitness center, and other common areas.
  • This is the first residential high rise in Chicago to meet silver LEED environmental standards set by the U.S. Green Building Council.
  • Three of the building's four facades vary to make them appropriate for the context from which they are viewed.
  • This is Chicago's first "green" residential tower. It has an 11,000 gallon tank for storing rainwater for watering the landscaping. It also has plants on the lower roof to reduce rainwater runoff, and special glass to reduce heat absorption and loss.
  • At the time of its completion, this was the tallest all-residential building in Chicago.
  • At the time of its completion, this building had 343 residences, which would have been symbolic if it were two fewer.
  • This building has six levels of parking below the level of East Randolph Street.
Quotations
  • "The jewel in Lakeshore East's crown"

    -The Wall Street Journal, September 17, 2004.

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